Gospel Headlines: 3/19/2012

When Should Christian’s Engage in Civil Disobedience? By Mark Coppenger.

Recently, Representative Gerry Connolly (D-Va.) heaped contempt upon five ministers called to testify before the House Oversight and Government Reform Committee. The men were there to raise religious liberty concerns over the Health and Human Services Department’s policy of forcing institutions to provide contraception, sterilization, and abortifacients to their employees, even when the institutions found these options morally objectionable. Though Romans Catholics were particularly stung by this policy, four other members of the clergy—two Baptists, a Lutheran, and a Jew—came as co-belligerents for the cause of freedom of conscience.

Blue Like Jazz: The Movie. By Mike Cosper.

Miller is giving voice to a whole generation whose fathers failed them, whose churches rang hollow, and who found friendship in the liberal world they’d been taught to hate and distrust. The intellectual rigor of progressives and their inclusive sense of community stood in sharp contrast to a past that felt morally and intellectually vacuous. At one moment in the film, the campus pope is rounding up books to burn, purging the campus of unacceptable spiritual reading. In Don’s room, he snatches up Chicken Soup for the Teenage Soul, a gift from Don’s mother upon graduation from high school. “Would a loving God let that exist?” he asks before tossing it into a burning shopping cart.

Are Mixed Martial Arts Ethical for Christians? By Owen Strachan.

I have spoken out fairly strongly against MMA in the past, and my basic convictions about the sport haven’t changed.  Christians should encourage the development of physical courage and ability in young men, yes.  They should reject pacificism, and they should encourage boys to be adventurous and tough.  But I don’t think that we should tie courage to unnecessary violence.  Courage for a needful aim is good; courage in service to a needless fight is not good, particularly when that fight will cause great damage to the body, much more than is necessary in “manhood training” or whatever you wish to call it.

Defining the “Mission of the Church. By Trevix Wax.

n thinking through these and other issues, I’m inclined to see the identity of the church – God’s called-out, “sent,” kingdom people – as an illuminating framework for wrestling with the other related issues of evangelism, mentoring, disciple-making, mercy ministry, etc. In the end, the “mission of the church” is part of an ongoing discussion that I hope will encourage us as the people of God to embrace our missionary identity.

About Greg Gibson
Greg serves as the family pastor at Foothills Church in Knoxville, TN. He is the author of Reformational Manhood: Creating a Culture of Gospel-Centered Warriors, and is a team member for the Council on Biblical Manhood & Womanhood (CBMW). He received a MDiv in biblical and theological studies from SBTS and a BA in biblical studies from Boyce College. He is married to the lovely Grace and is the father of two amazing little fireballs, Cora and Iver. An outdoor, CrossFit, and basketball enthusiast, he sleeps outside as much as he can.

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